Tag Archives: hanover county

Walking with Jesus. Walking with you.

jesus-and-his-friend-icon

Often called “Jesus and his friend” or “Christ with Believer,” this ancient Coptic icon depicts a man called Menas but could represent any one of us. The original is displayed in the Louvre Museum, Paris.

Back in 1994 when I served as a volunteer with the Ecumenical Community of Taizé in Burgundy, France, the founder of the community gave me a birthday present. It was a copy of an ancient Egyptian icon commonly called “Jesus and his friend.”  [The original is actually from the 8th century in and depicts Christ and Abba (Abbot) Mena (285-309 AD). It currently hangs in the Louvre in Paris.] As people gaze upon this icon during prayer and meditation, they often imagine, as I do, this friendly looking Jesus with his arm around them, talking about the cares of the day or hopes for the future. Walking together, the saint and Jesus seem to be moving toward the future, a future filled with hope.

After ten years serving at Messiah (and with my birthday just ahead), I’ve been thinking about this image a lot. I’m reminded to look for where Jesus has been walking with me and how, and the answers so often include you. We have been through many challenges together: lean economic times, personal loses and grief, even my own cancer diagnosis. Your prayers and support, your gifts of time, treasure and talent, have helped me and the congregation walk on right through these times. You have helped me see the light of Christ at work, and as I walk, even on darker days, I can find the peace and joy Christ promises.

What’s the future to bring? We are celebrating our 50 years as a congregation in 2018, so that is an appropriate question. Yet, I don’t fully know the answer any more than you – at least not in any detail or with certainty. What I do know is that I love you, and I give thanks to God for you. I appreciate your walking with Kristine and I through these ten years and toward the future. Through you and your shared love, Christ is seen and made known. I trust that whatever happens in the future, Jesus will walk on with us, faithfully loving us all the way. Each of us (and our congregation as a whole) will get to where we need to be. It may not always be easy, but our path will be blessed.

On behalf of Kristine and I, thank you for the many gifts and letters during the recent pastor appreciation month. It was quite uplifting and much appreciated. I also especially wish to thank Cheryl Griffis and Sally Bennett for heading up the 10X50=500 celebration and all those who have been coming together to make this day special. I look forward to rejoicing with you on December 3rd and throughout our Advent and Christmas season ahead.

Merry Christmas and a blessed New year to you all!
Pastor Lou

Originally published in Messiah Lutheran’s newsletter, The Messenger (December 2017/January 2018 edition).  

© 2017 The Rev. Louis Florio. All content not held under another’s copyright may not be used without permission of the author.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Community Life, Pastoral Letter

Spring is here

flowers

“I have held many things in my hands, and I have lost them all; but whatever I have placed in God’s hands, that I still possess.” Martin Luther

In this world, nothing lasts forever: fortunes fade or disappear, relationships end or move on, opportunities pass, and people sadly die. Therefore, change is often feared and the unknown suspected. If not in our words, our actions often reveal our true thoughts about this “reality.” We tend to make choices that are meant to protect ourselves from the world. Often based on fears and the perception of or needs or wants, they end up being choices that can hurt ourselves and others rather than bless. They can unintentionally, slowly separate us from God, others, and the abiding joy Christ promised for our present.

In contrast, spring reminds us that our struggles won’t last forever. Against stacked odds, we become witnesses to new life brought forth and the dead resurrected all around us. Birds sing, and flowers bloom. Time and again, great prophets like Isaiah shared God’s promises through such images (as in chapter thirty-five): “The wilderness and the dry land will be glad” or “the mirage will become a pool of water.” Based on such promises, he goes on to give a charge to the People of God, “Encourage the exhausted, and make staggering knees firm. Say to those with an anxious and panic-stricken heart, ‘Be strong, fear not!’”

Sowers plant seed, wait and watch for spring while longing for the harvest. It takes time and patience, intentionality and effort. Storms or droughts might come, but we break the ground to refresh the soil, remove weeds and dead growth. There’s a kind of sweat equity needed, yet many hands make lighter work. And so, we are asked to join with others trusting winter, want and war will not last forever. We plant in hope and trust spring will come and a certain harvest will follow.

This Easter, I hope we all reflect upon what God has done for us in Christ, but we should also consider what God is asking of us in response. We have been sent to this time and this place, for we still live in much the same world of Isaiah. People need our hope, help and companionship, and we need there’s. There’s much work to be done. The time is right for you and me and all to recommit to the work of the church…of being church together.

True, we and our congregation face many challenges each day, but Christ holds us in his crucified, resurrected, loving hands if we let him. Don’t hold onto the past or present with anxiety. Hold on to the promises of the Resurrection. Be strong. Fear not. Share all that you are and have with his Kingdom. Turn over all your cares to Christ. For, it is time to open our hearts and hands toward all anew and discover all the good which God intends to grow and give for our sake and the sake of the world.

Originally published in Messiah Lutheran’s newsletter, The Messenger (April 2017).

Unless otherwise indicated, all scripture quotations for this article are from the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) translation.

© 2017 The Rev. Louis Florio. All content not held under another’s copyright may not be used without permission of the author.

Leave a comment

Filed under Pastoral Letter, Uncategorized